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Open photo galleries of other selected 196th Signal Photo Company Photographers

A-F / G-L / M-R / S-Z

The Mediterranean campaigns have long been overshadowed in the American consciousness by Normandy, the Battle of the Bulge, and the ultimate fall of the Third Reich. Yet three-quarters of a million American soldiers served in Italy; 23,000 of them were killed there. Total Allied casualties in the Italian campaign exceeded 300,000. The co-authors continue to search for photos taken by the 3131st Signal Service Company and the 196th Signal Photo Company depicting the Italian Campaign. Three-man photo teams were assigned to cover Allied units throughout Italy. In this section we include links, resources and an Order of Battle index to Allied units.

Veteran's History Project

The Veterans History Project is a project of the Library of Congress aimed at collecting oral history interviews, memoirs, letters, diaries, photographs, and other original materials from veterans of World Wars I and II, and the Korean, Vietnam, and Persian Gulf Wars and the Afghanistan and Iraq conflicts (2001-present). Those U.S. citizen civilians who were actively involved in supporting war efforts (such as war industry workers, USO workers, flight instructors, medical volunteers, etc.) are also encouraged to contribute their personal narratives. Members of the public become part of the Veterans History Project after they donate their materials.  To learn more, click on the banner above or go to: http://www.loc.gov/vets/vets-home.html

Co-authors Julie Whitman Jones and Thomas J. Sullivan encourage veterans and their families to support the Veteran's History Project of the Library of Congress. Their primary focus is collecting first hand accounts of U.S. veterans from the following wars:

    In addition, those U.S. citizen civilians who were actively involved in supporting war efforts (such as war industry workers, USO workers, flight instructors, medical volunteers, etc.) are also invited to share their valuable stories.

 

Veteran's Organizations - Italian Campaign

34th Infantry Division
              34th Division Forum

New site and forum.  Includes history and combat reports. 

36th Division History  & 
    36th Division Forum
    History of 36th Division

Thru this site's forum, I made contact with the squad leader of my Uncle.  Includes a complete Roster.
History of 36th Division from GI-issued booklet.

10th Mountain Division

Good site.  Honor Roll has names of those killed in Italy.

88th Infantry Division Association

New and under construction.  New site.

The Polar Bear Association

339th Infantry Regiment of the 85th Division created by John Heiser, Historian for the Polar Bears.

USS General Alexander E. Anderson

Veteran's of the troop ship that took the 85th Division to Italy in 1943.  Also brought home the POWs of Bataan (movie 'The Raid').

376th Heavy Bombardment Group

Includes a list of missions & a roster of pilot.  Slow to load.

Tuskegee Airmen Inc.

The famous black fighter squadron.

American WW2 Orphans Network
  +  Dedication Page

AWON is a national organization of US War orphans of WW2.     + Tributes to soldiers killed in duty.

 

    National Archives

Finding Information on Personal Participation in World War II, a brochure on some of NARA's relevant records, and how to get started.

http://www.archives.gov/research/ww2/ww2-participation.pdf

http://www.archives.gov/research/ww2/

World War II Army Enlistment Records, created, 6/1/2002 - 9/30/2002, documenting the period ca. 1938 - 1946 - Record Group 64.

Series 111-C, color photographs of Signal Corps activity, 1944-83 (587 ft.), is the primary series of Signal Corps color prints, negatives, transparencies, and 35 mm slides for the period 1944-81 in the National Archives collection. 

 It also contains a small number of black and white prints and negatives, and a small number of items taken as recently as 1983. Subjects of photographic images include combat, Army posts, equipment, guns and weapons, aircraft, military exercises, military units and Special Forces, medical facilities, military ceremonies, American and foreign prisoners of war, foreign landscapes and populations, foreign armies and equipment, and art work depicting World War II, Korea, and Vietnam.

Typed captions appear on the back of prints; and most negatives, transparencies, and slides have captions on envelopes or slips of paper accompanying them. This series contains over 102,000 images. Items in this series are numbered and arranged by Signal Corps assigned "C" or "CC" numbers.

To assist researchers, several derivative series have been created that organize images into subject specific categories. Prints and negatives are filed in the primary 111-C series, and additional copies of relevant prints are filed in the following secondary series: CCA, army art collection; CCE, military and civilian personalities; CCG, portraits of general officers; CCK, U.S. Army activities in Korea; CCP, portraits of civilian personalities; CCS, U.S. Army Signal Corps, general subject file; CCV, U.S. Army activities in Vietnam; CPF, color print subject file, 1944-54; CRB, U.S. Army activities; and CTC, U.S. Army activities in Cambodia and Thailand. Three of these series are discussed in the following paragraphs.

 

The Liberation Trilogy

In the second volume of his epic trilogy about the liberation of Europe in World War II, Pulitzer Prize winner Rick Atkinson tells the harrowing story of the campaigns in Sicily and Italy. Explore http://www.liberationtrilogy.com/day_of_battle.htm and view interactive maps, view historical photos and read original historical documents pertaining to the Italian Campaign. NOTE: 196th Signal Photo Company

An Army At Dawn: The War in North Africa, 1943-1944 is the first installment of a three-volume history of the Allied liberation of Europe in World War II, covering the War in North Africa.

The second volume is The Day Of Battle: The War in Sicily and Italy, 1943-1944, covering the Allied invasion and liberation of Italy. NOTE: Major General Matthew B. Ridgeway (right), commander of the 82nd Airborne Division, with a Signal Corps cameraman in central Sicily, July 25, 1943. Don Wiedenmayer identifies the photographer as Frank L. Morang who later received a battlefield commission.

The third volume, a history of the war in Western Europe, will be published in the future.

 

Units of UNITED STATES and Unit Insignia Patches

   The following tables provides a brief description of each Army, Corps and Division that was associated with the American troops.  The first table explains the higher commands that were in Italy, but the main purpose is to provide a quick reference for each of the U.S. divisions.

15TH ARMY

  GROUP


  


The 15th Army Group was the highest command in Italy and commanded the 5th US Army and 8th British Army.
 General Mark Clark was promoted to command the Group late in 1944.

5THARMY

The 5th Army was organized in North African, which shows in the design of the patch.  The design of the patch was submitted by General Mark Clark.  The 5th Army fought along the west coast of Italy, until the Allies reached the Po Valley, where it spread out in both directions. The 5th Army bore the brunt of many of the battles as the British 8th Army was tired from fighting in North Africa.  The current Headquarters of the 5th Army is located in the Quadrangle at Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, TX.

II CORPS

The II Corps (usually written with Roman numerals) began its operations in North Africa.  Later, in Italy the II Corps consisted of mostly US troops until more units appeared in 1945. 

IV CORPS

 

The IV Corps arrived Italy in March 1944 and entered combat in June 11, 1944.  Fought continuously for 401 days.    CG was Lt-Gen A. M. Patch and Maj-Gen Wilis D. Crittenberger.
1945 Po Valley Campaign: 10 Mtn, 34, 85, 92, 1 Armd, 6 S. African Armd, 1 Brazilian Divisions,
442 RCT, 473 RCT, 91 Cav Recon Sqd,  751, 756, 758, 760 Tnk Btln, 679, 791, 894 Tnk Destroyer, Legnano Group, 424 FA Btn, 1108 Engr Btn,  84 Chemical Btn, 7th Para? (Brit)
Italy, March 1944 

VI CORPS

The VI Corps was the American half of the 5th Army invasion of Italy at Salerno.  It was commanded by Maj. Gen. Ernest J. Dawley and consisted of the 36th and 45th divisions and part of 82nd Airborne Division.   Maj. Gen.John P. Lucas commanded the corps during the Anzio landings.  Later it was composed of American and British. 

 8TH
ARMY 
British

 The British 8th Army had fought a long hard campaign in the desert of North Africa before going into Sicily and then to Italy.  The 8th Army landed on the "toe" of Italy a few days before the 5th landed at Salerno.  From there, they progressed up the east coast of Italy.  Many of the experienced units were transferred out of Italy, but the 8th Army remained during entire war.
   
CG- General Bernard 'Monty' Montgomery until 31 Dec 1943. Lt.-Gen Sir Oliver Leese.  Gen Sir Richard L. McCreery from 1 Oct 1944 - end of war.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ALLIED ARMY - Order of Battle Gothic Line - 25th August 1944

After the fall of Rome, the Germans retreated back across the Arno River and into the natural defenses of the Appenine Mountains.  Several experienced Allied divisions were pulled out of Italy and sent to southern France.  The Allied Army launched an attack against the well-prepared GOTHIC Line defenses without a man-power superiority required for victory.
The Germans were able to hold the Allied advance and prevent them from entering the Po Valley before the fall rains and winter came.  This is the organization of the Corps and Divisions during the fall of 1944.  The commanders names are listed in (paranthesis).

 

FIFTEENTH ARMY GROUP (Alexander)

FIFTH U.S. ARMY (Clark)

II CORPS        (Keyes)
34TH INFANTRY DIVISION   (Walker)
88TH INFANTRY DIVISION   (
Kendall)
91ST INFANTRY DIVISION   (Livesay)

IV CORPS           (Crittenberger)
6TH SOUTH AFRICAN ARMORED DIVISION   (Poole)
85TH INFANTRY DIVISION   (Coulter)
442ND REGIMENTAL COMBAT TEAM

XIII BRITISH CORPS    (Kirkman)
1ST (BRITISH) INFANTRY DIVISION   (Loewen)
6TH (BRITISH) ARMORED DIVISION   (
Murray)
8TH (INDIAN) INFANTRY DIVISION   (Russell)

RESERVE
BRAZILIAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCE (Mascarenas de Morais)
1ST U.S. ARMORED DIVISION    (
Prichard)

EIGHTH BRITISH ARMY
(Leese)

V CORPS          (Keightley)
1ST ARMOURED DIVISION (
Hull)
4TH INFANTRY DIVISION     (Ward)
4TH (INDIAN) INFANTRY DIVISION    (Holworthy)
46TH INFANTRY '
NORTH MIDLAND' DIVISION    (Hawkesworth)
56TH INFANTRY '
LONDON' DIVISION    (Whitfield)
7TH ARMOURED BRIGADE
25TH TANK BRIGADE

I CANADIAN CORPS     (Burns)
1ST INFANTRY DIVISION     (Vokes)
2ND
NEW ZEALAND DIVISION (Freyberg)
5TH ARMOURED DIVISION  (Hoffmeister)
21ST TANK BRIGADE
3RD GREEK MOUNTAIN BRIGADE

II POLISH CORPS           (Anders)
3RD CARPATHIAN RIFLE DIVISION
5TH KRESOWA INFANTRY DIVISION
2ND ARMOURED BRIGADE

X BRITISH CORPS              (McCreery)
10TH (INDIAN) INFANTRY DIVISION     (Reid)
9TH ARMOURED BRIGADE

RESERVE            
2ND 
NEW ZEALAND INFANTRY DIVISION 
3RD GREEK MOUNTAIN BRIGADE
 

Spring Offensive 1945

5th Army consisted of IV Corps in the west, under Maj. Gen. Willis D. Crittenberger, and the U.S. II Corps in the east, under Maj. Gen. Geoffrey Keyes
34th Infantry Division
85th  Infantry Division
88th Infantry Division
91st  Infantry Division
92nd  Infantry Division

 

92nd Infantry Division

 

 

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fgFo9o4a9DM - Miracle of St. Anna Spike Lee trailer

 

The Last Battle: The Uphill Battle of the 10th Mountain Division - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BVmjVe5AKn8

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NDLwezMHOAE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YJZWcwob8oo

 

10th Mountain Division
1st Armored Division
442d Regimental Combat Team
1st Brazilian Infantry Division
Italian Legnano Combat Group
6th South African Armored Division

British Eighth Army, commanded by General Sir Richard L. McCreery, included the Polish 2d Corps and the British 5th, 10th, and 13th Corps, and controlled eight divisions from four different nations, as well as four free Italian battle groups and a Jewish brigade.
 

DIADEM - Allied attack on 11 May 1944,

    Fifth Army casualties
             17,931
US casualties: 3,145 KIA,  13,704 WIA, and 1,082 MIA.
            10,635  French (5th Army) casualties
             3,355 British (5th Army) casualties
     Eighth Army casualties 11,639
     Total Allied -  43,000
    German 38,000, for 10th and 14th Armies, not including 15,606 PW.
 

GOTHIC LINE - Apennine Mountains
September 12-18 - Attack to capture Il
Futa Pass
  II Corps(91st & 85th Divisions) had sustained 2,730 casualties.
September 22 - 31, 88th Division suffered 2,105 casualties.
October 4 - 91st Division lost over 1,730 American casualties in just four days.
October 5-9 - Fifth Army units advanced only three more miles, taking an additional 1,400 casualties.
    In Summary, between 10 September and
26 October, 1944
         II Corps(4 divisions) over 15,000 casualties ( 88th Division alone over 5,000 men).
        Eighth Army - 14,000 casualties for about same period.

AMERICAN CASUALTIES - 5th Army
     189,000 casualties within all US and foriegn units of the US 5th Army.
      American Casualties:  109,642 including 19,475 Killed.
                                                          
        Source:  "Calculated Risk" by Gen. Clark

 

Click here to register a veteran with the WW II Memorial Registry! The memory of America's World War II generation is preserved within the physical memorial and through the World War II Registry of Remembrances, an individual listing of Americans who contributed to the war effort. Any U.S. citizen who helped win the war, whether a veteran or someone on the home front, is eligible for the Registry. Names in the Registry will be forever linked to the memorial's bronze and granite representations of their sacrifice and achievement.

 

 

196th Signal Photo Company Photographers - Selected Photos

These special tribute pages features some of the significant still photography of five Army Signal Corps photographers who served in the 196th Signal Photo Company. They include:

Harry Morgan / Cecil "Max"Campbell / John Mason / Donald Wiedenmayer / Jerry Kosseff

Index to 196th Signal Photo Company - Still Photo Gallery

Known Army Signal Corps photographs attributed by Signal Corps serial number to individual members of the 3131st Signal Service Company and the 196th Signal Photo Company, Italian Campaign, 1944-1945. These photos were obtained from the National Archives and the public domain.

A-F / G-L / M-R / S-Z

 

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Home / About the Co-Authors / About the Book / The Latest - Author Events / Edmund Burke O'Connell / Media Inquiries / Screenplay / Villa Calamai / Donald Wiedenmayer / Contact the Authors / Buy the Book

 

Historical Resources

O'Connell's Equipment: Bell & Howell 35mm Eyemo Camera

Captain Melvin Gillette / Architect of the Army Pictorial Service

Selected Reference Materials (Orders and Official Documents) / Army Pictorial Service - North Africa

196th SPC - Awards and Decorations / 196th SPC Roll of Honor / 196th SPC - Unit History

/ 196th SPC - Campaign for Sicily / 196th SPC - Motion Picture Coverage / 196th - Still Photo Coverage

 Bibliography / Veteran's History Project / Nauders Crossroads - 1945

 

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The Last Farewell - A journey of the heart

By Edmund Burke O'Connell and co-authors Julie Whitman Jones and Thomas J. Sullivan, Jr.

email the authors: info@thelastfarewell.net

 

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